Governor visits to talk sex offender legislation 2013

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Governor visits to talk sex offender legislation 2013

Post by Admin on Sun Sep 15, 2013 2:55 am

2013 2013 2013 <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-0z8Ak9rex0s/UemNg25kPzI/AAAAAAAAAYA/j7JaF2Rgf3g/s1600/a-news-4.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;"><img border="0" height="146" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-0z8Ak9rex0s/UemNg25kPzI/AAAAAAAAAYA/j7JaF2Rgf3g/s200/a-news-4.jpg" width="200" /></a></div><blockquote><span style="font-family: trebuchet ms; color:#ff0000;"><b> Most interesting here is, the mistaken belief that, the Legislature or the Public has any current right to determine "Current Dangerousness (if any)" of folks on the registry. Dangerousness is a function of the Judiciary and that was established at sentencing. Once the judge sets that term, then after it is completed, the person is again on equal footing with anyone else in society; legally speaking, according to the Judicial Systems in America. There is no right to retry a person, unless there is further misconduct and then only by a judge.</b></span></blockquote><b>9-5-2013 Missouri:</b><br /><br /><b>Nixon says veto override could weaken sex offender websites</b><br /><br />FARMINGTON – Gov. Jay Nixon joined local law enforcement officials Friday at the Southeast Missouri Mental Health Center in Farmington to discuss the importance of sustaining his veto of House Bill 301, which he says would remove hundreds of sex offenders from public sex offender websites.<br /><br />The governor vetoed House Bill 301 in July citing concerns it would weaken public safety and victims’ rights by weakening state laws regarding sexual offenders. Recently, leadership in the Missouri House of Representatives has expressed their desire to override Nixon’s veto of House Bill 301.<br /><br />Surrounded by easels holding large photos of incarcerated Missouri sex offenders, Nixon said, “By erasing the names of hundreds of criminals from sex offender websites and law enforcement registries, without regard to the seriousness of their offense, House Bill 301 would weaken public safety and ignore victims’ rights. House Bill 301 would also deny local prosecutors and victims of these atrocious crimes the opportunity to have their voices heard before an offender is removed. The leadership of the House may be ready to help violent sex offenders hide from the public and law enforcement, but their victims, and the millions of Missourians who use these websites to help keep their families safe, are not.”<br /><span id="fullpost"><br />Prior to Nixon arriving on the health center grounds, Missouri Rep. Kevin Engler (R-Farmington) paid a brief visit to members of the press assembled to hear from the governor. He explained that, while he had been invited by the governor to attend the event, he was headed out of town for a family obligation. Engler noted that he’d just driven by the Farmington Airport where he’d seen the governor’s jet parked on the tarmac.<br /><br />“It’s nice to know that even though the governor says the state has no money, he flew in today on his $5 million jet,” he said.<br /><br />He then pointed at the photos on either side of the governor’s lectern and commented, “None of the men pictured in these photos would be affected in any way by House Bill 301, but I doubt the governor’s veto of the bill will be overturned anyway.”<br /><br />Walking back towards the parking lot, Engler turned and said, “I’m leaving for vacation with my family in our van using gas that was paid for by myself, unlike the jet fuel Missouri citizens paid for to have Gov. Nixon come speak here today.”<br /><br />According to the governor, if his veto were to be overridden, House Bill 301 would remove an estimated 870 individuals who committed a sex offense as a juvenile (under 18) from the state and county sexual offender notification websites, and prevent any such individual from being placed on these websites in the future. <br /><br />“This legislation would remove these juvenile sex offenders from the public notification websites regardless of the sexual offense for which they were convicted, including forcible rape, forcible sodomy and child molestation,” he said. “Additionally, House Bill 301 would allow sex offenders who were convicted when they were juveniles to petition a court for their removal from the state sexual offender registry after only five years from being found guilty or completing their prison sentence.” <br /><br />He added that, even if the offender had multiple victims and multiple convictions, the court would be required to grant the petition so long as the offender was not currently under supervision or was adjudicated for failure to register; and without being able to consider if the offender successfully completed any court required treatment.<br /><br />Also, Nixon said House Bill 301 would prevent the victims of the crime or their families from having any input into the offender’s removal from the registry. <br /><br />“I do not believe that supporters of this legislation meant for its ramifications to go this far. That’s why after a careful review of this legislation in its entirety, I clearly communicated my concerns to the legislature last month in my veto message,” Gov. Nixon said. “Now that lawmakers have a full understanding of the seriousness of House Bill 301, they can not in good conscience vote for it again. We owe it to the crime victims and their families to ensure this dangerous bill does not become law.” <a href="http://dailyjournalonline.com/news/local/governor-visits-to-talk-sex-offender-legislation/article_82feccc2-1559-11e3-be91-001a4bcf887a.html">..Source..</a> by Kevin Jenkins </span><br> 2013 2013 2013 <br><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-0z8Ak9rex0s/UemNg25kPzI/AAAAAAAAAYA/j7JaF2Rgf3g/s1600/a-news-4.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;"><img border="0" height="146" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-0z8Ak9rex0s/UemNg25kPzI/AAAAAAAAAYA/j7JaF2Rgf3g/s200/a-news-4.jpg" width="200" /></a></div><blockquote><span style="font-family: trebuchet ms; color:#ff0000;"><b> Most interesting here is, the mistaken belief that, the Legislature or the Public has any current right to determine "Current Dangerousness (if any)" of folks on the registry. Dangerousness is a function of the Judiciary and that was established at sentencing. Once the judge sets that term, then after it is completed, the person is again on equal footing with anyone else in society; legally speaking, according to the Judicial Systems in America. There is no right to retry a person, unless there is further misconduct and then only by a judge.</b></span></blockquote><b>9-5-2013 Missouri:</b><br /><br /><b>Nixon says veto override could weaken sex offender websites</b><br /><br />FARMINGTON – Gov. Jay Nixon joined local law enforcement officials Friday at the Southeast Missouri Mental Health Center in Farmington to discuss the importance of sustaining his veto of House Bill 301, which he says would remove hundreds of sex offenders from public sex offender websites.<br /><br />The governor vetoed House Bill 301 in July citing concerns it would weaken public safety and victims’ rights by weakening state laws regarding sexual offenders. Recently, leadership in the Missouri House of Representatives has expressed their desire to override Nixon’s veto of House Bill 301.<br /><br />Surrounded by easels holding large photos of incarcerated Missouri sex offenders, Nixon said, “By erasing the names of hundreds of criminals from sex offender websites and law enforcement registries, without regard to the seriousness of their offense, House Bill 301 would weaken public safety and ignore victims’ rights. House Bill 301 would also deny local prosecutors and victims of these atrocious crimes the opportunity to have their voices heard before an offender is removed. The leadership of the House may be ready to help violent sex offenders hide from the public and law enforcement, but their victims, and the millions of Missourians who use these websites to help keep their families safe, are not.”<br /><span id="fullpost"><br />Prior to Nixon arriving on the health center grounds, Missouri Rep. Kevin Engler (R-Farmington) paid a brief visit to members of the press assembled to hear from the governor. He explained that, while he had been invited by the governor to attend the event, he was headed out of town for a family obligation. Engler noted that he’d just driven by the Farmington Airport where he’d seen the governor’s jet parked on the tarmac.<br /><br />“It’s nice to know that even though the governor says the state has no money, he flew in today on his $5 million jet,” he said.<br /><br />He then pointed at the photos on either side of the governor’s lectern and commented, “None of the men pictured in these photos would be affected in any way by House Bill 301, but I doubt the governor’s veto of the bill will be overturned anyway.”<br /><br />Walking back towards the parking lot, Engler turned and said, “I’m leaving for vacation with my family in our van using gas that was paid for by myself, unlike the jet fuel Missouri citizens paid for to have Gov. Nixon come speak here today.”<br /><br />According to the governor, if his veto were to be overridden, House Bill 301 would remove an estimated 870 individuals who committed a sex offense as a juvenile (under 18) from the state and county sexual offender notification websites, and prevent any such individual from being placed on these websites in the future. <br /><br />“This legislation would remove these juvenile sex offenders from the public notification websites regardless of the sexual offense for which they were convicted, including forcible rape, forcible sodomy and child molestation,” he said. “Additionally, House Bill 301 would allow sex offenders who were convicted when they were juveniles to petition a court for their removal from the state sexual offender registry after only five years from being found guilty or completing their prison sentence.” <br /><br />He added that, even if the offender had multiple victims and multiple convictions, the court would be required to grant the petition so long as the offender was not currently under supervision or was adjudicated for failure to register; and without being able to consider if the offender successfully completed any court required treatment.<br /><br />Also, Nixon said House Bill 301 would prevent the victims of the crime or their families from having any input into the offender’s removal from the registry. <br /><br />“I do not believe that supporters of this legislation meant for its ramifications to go this far. That’s why after a careful review of this legislation in its entirety, I clearly communicated my concerns to the legislature last month in my veto message,” Gov. Nixon said. “Now that lawmakers have a full understanding of the seriousness of House Bill 301, they can not in good conscience vote for it again. We owe it to the crime victims and their families to ensure this dangerous bill does not become law.” <a href="http://dailyjournalonline.com/news/local/governor-visits-to-talk-sex-offender-legislation/article_82feccc2-1559-11e3-be91-001a4bcf887a.html">..Source..</a> by Kevin Jenkins </span><br>2013 2013 2013 <br> <a href="http://www.matrixar.com/" title="Matrix ">المصفوفة : أجمل الخلفيات والصور</a>

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