Risk assessment tools plagued by

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Risk assessment tools plagued by

Post by Admin on Sun Sep 15, 2013 2:55 am

2013 2013 2013 <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-4DLR8UdHM2g/T_cThZ31mlI/AAAAAAAADgI/lvDc-pRYGxY/s1600/a-franklin-in-news.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;"><img border="0" height="43" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-4DLR8UdHM2g/T_cThZ31mlI/AAAAAAAADgI/lvDc-pRYGxY/s320/a-franklin-in-news.jpg" width="320" /></a></div><b>9-5-2013 National:</b><br /><br /><b>Reported predictive validity higher in studies by an instrument's designers than by independent researchers</b><br /><br />The use of actuarial risk assessment instruments to predict violence is becoming more and more central to forensic psychology practice. And clinicians and courts rely on published data to establish that the tools live up to their claims of accurately separating high-risk from low-risk offenders.<br /><br />But as it turns out, the predictive validity of risk assessment instruments such as the Static-99 and the VRAG depends in part on the researcher's connection to the instrument in question.<br /><br />Published studies authored by tool designers reported predictive validity findings around two times higher than investigations by independent researchers, according to a systematic meta-analysis that included 30,165 participants in 104 samples from 83 independent studies.<br /><span id="fullpost"><br /><b>Conflicts of interest shrouded</b><br /><br />Compounding the problem, in not a single case did instrument designers openly report this potential conflict of interest, even when a journal's policies mandated such disclosure.<br /><br />As the study authors point out, an instrument’s designers have a vested interest in their procedure working well. Financial profits from manuals, coding sheets and training sessions depend in part on the perceived accuracy of a risk assessment tool. Indirectly, developers of successful instruments can be hired as expert witnesses, attract research funding, and achieve professional recognition and career advancement.<br /><br />These potential rewards may make tool designers more reluctant to publish studies in which their instrument performs poorly. This "file drawer problem," well established in other scientific fields, has led to a call for researchers to publicly register intended studies in advance, before their outcomes are known.<br /><br />The researchers found no evidence that the authorship effect was due to higher methodological rigor in studies carried out by instrument designers, such as better inter-rater reliability or more standardized training of instrument raters.<br /><br />"The credibility of future research findings may be questioned in the absence of measures to tackle these issues," the authors warn. "To promote transparency in future research, tool authors and translators should routinely report their potential conflict of interest when publishing research investigating the predictive validity of their tool." <a href="http://forensicpsychologist.blogspot.com/2013/09/risk-assessment-tools-plagued-by.html">..continued..</a> by Karen Franklin, In the News</span><br> 2013 2013 2013 <br><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-4DLR8UdHM2g/T_cThZ31mlI/AAAAAAAADgI/lvDc-pRYGxY/s1600/a-franklin-in-news.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;"><img border="0" height="43" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-4DLR8UdHM2g/T_cThZ31mlI/AAAAAAAADgI/lvDc-pRYGxY/s320/a-franklin-in-news.jpg" width="320" /></a></div><b>9-5-2013 National:</b><br /><br /><b>Reported predictive validity higher in studies by an instrument's designers than by independent researchers</b><br /><br />The use of actuarial risk assessment instruments to predict violence is becoming more and more central to forensic psychology practice. And clinicians and courts rely on published data to establish that the tools live up to their claims of accurately separating high-risk from low-risk offenders.<br /><br />But as it turns out, the predictive validity of risk assessment instruments such as the Static-99 and the VRAG depends in part on the researcher's connection to the instrument in question.<br /><br />Published studies authored by tool designers reported predictive validity findings around two times higher than investigations by independent researchers, according to a systematic meta-analysis that included 30,165 participants in 104 samples from 83 independent studies.<br /><span id="fullpost"><br /><b>Conflicts of interest shrouded</b><br /><br />Compounding the problem, in not a single case did instrument designers openly report this potential conflict of interest, even when a journal's policies mandated such disclosure.<br /><br />As the study authors point out, an instrument’s designers have a vested interest in their procedure working well. Financial profits from manuals, coding sheets and training sessions depend in part on the perceived accuracy of a risk assessment tool. Indirectly, developers of successful instruments can be hired as expert witnesses, attract research funding, and achieve professional recognition and career advancement.<br /><br />These potential rewards may make tool designers more reluctant to publish studies in which their instrument performs poorly. This "file drawer problem," well established in other scientific fields, has led to a call for researchers to publicly register intended studies in advance, before their outcomes are known.<br /><br />The researchers found no evidence that the authorship effect was due to higher methodological rigor in studies carried out by instrument designers, such as better inter-rater reliability or more standardized training of instrument raters.<br /><br />"The credibility of future research findings may be questioned in the absence of measures to tackle these issues," the authors warn. "To promote transparency in future research, tool authors and translators should routinely report their potential conflict of interest when publishing research investigating the predictive validity of their tool." <a href="http://forensicpsychologist.blogspot.com/2013/09/risk-assessment-tools-plagued-by.html">..continued..</a> by Karen Franklin, In the News</span><br>2013 2013 2013 <br> <a href="http://www.matrixar.com/" title="Matrix ">المصفوفة : أجمل الخلفيات والصور</a>

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