The Grandmaster (2013) 2013

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The Grandmaster (2013) 2013

Post by Admin on Sun Sep 15, 2013 5:29 am

2013 2013 2013 <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-4EPZ8WlAV0c/UivGg2Yt_BI/AAAAAAAAG1Q/bGZ3uBTF5OQ/s1600/grandmaster.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="268" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-4EPZ8WlAV0c/UivGg2Yt_BI/AAAAAAAAG1Q/bGZ3uBTF5OQ/s640/grandmaster.png" width="640" /></a></div>WHO: Wong Kar-Wai directed this.<br /><br />WHAT: <i style="font-weight: bold;">The Grandmaster</i>&nbsp;is, like all of Wong's prior feature films (at least those that I've seen; I confess to having skipped his previous&nbsp;<i style="font-weight: bold;">My Blueberry Nights</i>&nbsp;and never having caught up with his first film <i style="font-weight: bold;">As Tears Go By</i>), constructed of beautiful images. If there were such thing as a device that could project a single, held, 35mm film frame onto a wall constantly, without incurring its destruction through the melting heat of the projector lamp, there's hardly a frame in the film that wouldn't be a lovely adornment to a darkened space, ripe for study of color, lighting, and composition within the frame. Of course, such a method of looking at the film would be in conflict with what Wong does with editing here, namely that he edits the hell out of his action sequences, making them into a furious flurry of movement without compromising their narrative function.<br /><br />That all said, the overarching narrative felt to me rather empty of emotion and import, unlike in his (according to me) best movies <i style="font-weight: bold;">In The Mood For Love</i>, <i style="font-weight: bold;">Fallen Angels</i>&nbsp;and even <i style="font-weight: bold;">Ashes of Time</i>. Watching <i style="font-weight: bold;">The Grandmaster</i>&nbsp;was unlike watching those films, or the "old-school" kung fu from filmmakers like Chang Cheh and Lau Kar-Leung who stripped down storytelling to archetypal forms to prevent plot complexities from overwhelming the urgency of their action. Wong is in dialogue with a very complicated history rife with Confucian and nationalistic themes, many of which I'm sure I couldn't discern on a single viewing. But watching it, at least on a 35mm print, was nonetheless extraordinarily pleasurable on a sensory level. I would like to re-watch the film after reading&nbsp;<a href="http://cinema-scope.com/features/one-horizontal-one-vertical-some-preliminary-observations-on-wong-kar-wais-the-grandmaster/">Shelly Kracier</a>'s persuasive review, in the hopes that I'd get more out of it on an intellectual level as well, knowing that even if I didn't, I would still have an eye-fortifying experience.<br /><br />WHERE/WHEN: Screens multiple times daily at cinemas around Frisco Bay, including the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.lntsf.com/4-star-theatre.html">4-Star Theatre</a>. The latter is closed for a private event on Tuesday, September 10, however.<br /><br />WHY: As I intimated in my recent piece on <b><i><a href="http://hellonfriscobay.blogspot.com/2013/08/drug-war-2012.html">Drug War</a></i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">, the universe seems just a little bit closer to balanced whenever there's a Chinese-language film playing at the 4-Star. That goes double when it's a film by someone whose work I fell in love with there, like Johnnie To or Wong Kar-Wai (it's there that showings of </span><i>In The Mood For Love</i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">&nbsp;and <b><i>Ashes of Time</i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">&nbsp;and to a more intermittent extent <i><b>2046</b></i><b>&nbsp;</b>made me swoo<b><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">n).</span>&nbsp;</b></span></b>And it goes triple when there's (unlike <i><b>Drug War</b>)&nbsp;</i>one available to screen in a 35mm print, as the 4-Star is among the last Frisco Bay theatres keeping its actual film projectors running when possible. And </span><i>The Grandmaster</i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">&nbsp;is indeed screening there that way this week (as well as English-language films <b><i>The Way, Way Back</i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">&nbsp;and </span><i><a href="http://hellonfriscobay.blogspot.com/2013/07/fruitvale-station-2013.html">Fruitvale Station</a></i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">.) I don't know if the next Hong Kong production to come to the venue will be on 35mm, but I do know it's called&nbsp;</span><i>Ip Man: The Final Fight</i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;"> and it comes from two key member of the team behind another film I first saw at the 4-Star,&nbsp;</span><i>The Untold Story<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">. <span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-style: normal;">That queasy film's co-director Herman Yau is the solo director behind this, and it reuintes him once again (they've worked together a dozen times) with that film's star Anthony Wong.</span></span></i></b></span></b><br /><br />More Chinese-language films are being brought this fall to the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.bampfa.berkeley.edu/filmseries/yangfudong">Pacific Film Archive</a>, and to the <a href="http://www.cinemasf.com/vogue/">Vogue</a>, which, thanks to the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.sffs.org/Exhibition/Fall-Season.aspx">San Francisco Film Society</a>&nbsp;will be hosting two brief mini-festivals devoted to films from Hong Kong (October 4-6) and from Taiwan (November 1-3). The line-up for the latter is as-yet unannounced, but I wonder if it's hoping too much for me to imagine it to be an opportunity to see the new <a href="http://www.fandor.com/blog/daily-gianfranco-rosis-sacro-gra-wins-the-golden-lion">Venice</a> prize-winning film from one of Taipei's best filmmakers, Tsai Ming-Liang's <b><i>Stray Dogs</i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">. Possibly, since we still haven't had a chance to see Tsai's prior feature <i><b>Face</b></i> on Frisco Bay cinema screens.</span></b><br /><b><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;"><br /></span></b><b><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">But the <a href="http://sffs.org/Exhibition/Fall-Season/Hong-Kong-Cinema">Hong Kong Cinema</a>&nbsp;series has its line-up set. Johnnie To fans won't have to wait any longer to catch up with the prolific director, as his </span><i><a href="http://www.fandor.com/blog/daily-cannes-2013-johnnie-tos-blind-detective">Blind Detective</a></i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">&nbsp;screens opening night of the festival. Another film fresh from Cannes 2013 is Flora Lau's feature debut&nbsp;</span><i><a href="http://mubi.com/notebook/posts/cannes-2013-double-bend-flora-laus-bends">Bends</a></i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">, which was shot by Wong Kar-Wai's former cinematographer Christopher Doyle, and which competed in the <i>Un Certain Regard </i>section of the French festival.&nbsp;</span></b><br /><b><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;"><br /></span></b>Johnnie To's production company Milkyway Pictures also lent support to a film made by students at the Hong Kong Academy of Performing Arts called <b><i><a href="http://sffs.org/content.aspx?catid=928,943,1640&amp;pageid=3553">A Complicated Story</a></i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">, which debuted at this year's Hong Kong International Film Festival and whose director Kiwi Chow is expected to attend his screening at the Vogue. I'm also interested in the new film from Oxide Pang called&nbsp;<a href="http://sffs.org/content.aspx?catid=928,943,1640&amp;pageid=3554"><i><b>Conspirators</b></i></a>; Pang made a splash early in his career as one half of the co-directing team behind the original </span><i>Bangkok Dangerous</i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">&nbsp;and </span><i>The Eye</i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">&nbsp;but I was less impressed with the films he made without his brother Danny Pang (and vice versa) at that time. But ten years and a pair of forgettable Hollywood films later (including the Nicholas Cage-starring remake of </span><i>Bangkok Dangerous</i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">) and it may be time to take another look at the Pang Brothers solo again.</span></b><br /><br />Finally, and perhaps most excitingly, Hong Kong Cinema will bring two of the best kung-fu movies made by the great director Lau Kar-Leung (a.k.a.&nbsp;Liu Chia-liang), who died at age 78 this past June after two decades of battling with cancer. Lau's most famous work, the action-packed but near-avant-garde in its minimalistic plot&nbsp;<b><i><a href="http://sffs.org/content.aspx?catid=928,943,1640&amp;pageid=3549">36th Chamber of Shaolin</a></i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">, will screen Saturday afternoon of the festival while </span><i><a href="http://sffs.org/content.aspx?catid=928,943,1640&amp;pageid=3552">Eight Diagram Pole Fighter</a></i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">, my own favorite martial arts movie of all time, screens Sunday. I believe these will be digital screenings, but it will be hard for me to resist attending anyway as I've never seen either film on a cinema screen with an audience. I hope the booking encourages the <a href="http://www.roxie.com/">Roxie</a> to book 35mm prints of Lau's films (of </span><i>Dirty Ho&nbsp;</i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">and <b><i>Eight Diagram Pole Figher</i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">, at the very least)&nbsp;</span></b>that I hear are in the possession of&nbsp;<a href="http://dailygrindhouse.com/thewire/know-your-programmer-katie-rife-talks-to-dan-halsted-of-portlands-hollywood-theatre/">Dan Halsted</a>, who brought two kung fu double-bills to that venue last year.</span></b><br /><br />HOW: <i style="font-weight: bold;">The Grandmaster </i>screens in 35mm at the 4-Star but digitally elsewhere. It was shot mostly on film, but high-speed action shots used a digital camera.<br> 2013 2013 2013 <br><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-4EPZ8WlAV0c/UivGg2Yt_BI/AAAAAAAAG1Q/bGZ3uBTF5OQ/s1600/grandmaster.png" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="268" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-4EPZ8WlAV0c/UivGg2Yt_BI/AAAAAAAAG1Q/bGZ3uBTF5OQ/s640/grandmaster.png" width="640" /></a></div>WHO: Wong Kar-Wai directed this.<br /><br />WHAT: <i style="font-weight: bold;">The Grandmaster</i>&nbsp;is, like all of Wong's prior feature films (at least those that I've seen; I confess to having skipped his previous&nbsp;<i style="font-weight: bold;">My Blueberry Nights</i>&nbsp;and never having caught up with his first film <i style="font-weight: bold;">As Tears Go By</i>), constructed of beautiful images. If there were such thing as a device that could project a single, held, 35mm film frame onto a wall constantly, without incurring its destruction through the melting heat of the projector lamp, there's hardly a frame in the film that wouldn't be a lovely adornment to a darkened space, ripe for study of color, lighting, and composition within the frame. Of course, such a method of looking at the film would be in conflict with what Wong does with editing here, namely that he edits the hell out of his action sequences, making them into a furious flurry of movement without compromising their narrative function.<br /><br />That all said, the overarching narrative felt to me rather empty of emotion and import, unlike in his (according to me) best movies <i style="font-weight: bold;">In The Mood For Love</i>, <i style="font-weight: bold;">Fallen Angels</i>&nbsp;and even <i style="font-weight: bold;">Ashes of Time</i>. Watching <i style="font-weight: bold;">The Grandmaster</i>&nbsp;was unlike watching those films, or the "old-school" kung fu from filmmakers like Chang Cheh and Lau Kar-Leung who stripped down storytelling to archetypal forms to prevent plot complexities from overwhelming the urgency of their action. Wong is in dialogue with a very complicated history rife with Confucian and nationalistic themes, many of which I'm sure I couldn't discern on a single viewing. But watching it, at least on a 35mm print, was nonetheless extraordinarily pleasurable on a sensory level. I would like to re-watch the film after reading&nbsp;<a href="http://cinema-scope.com/features/one-horizontal-one-vertical-some-preliminary-observations-on-wong-kar-wais-the-grandmaster/">Shelly Kracier</a>'s persuasive review, in the hopes that I'd get more out of it on an intellectual level as well, knowing that even if I didn't, I would still have an eye-fortifying experience.<br /><br />WHERE/WHEN: Screens multiple times daily at cinemas around Frisco Bay, including the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.lntsf.com/4-star-theatre.html">4-Star Theatre</a>. The latter is closed for a private event on Tuesday, September 10, however.<br /><br />WHY: As I intimated in my recent piece on <b><i><a href="http://hellonfriscobay.blogspot.com/2013/08/drug-war-2012.html">Drug War</a></i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">, the universe seems just a little bit closer to balanced whenever there's a Chinese-language film playing at the 4-Star. That goes double when it's a film by someone whose work I fell in love with there, like Johnnie To or Wong Kar-Wai (it's there that showings of </span><i>In The Mood For Love</i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">&nbsp;and <b><i>Ashes of Time</i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">&nbsp;and to a more intermittent extent <i><b>2046</b></i><b>&nbsp;</b>made me swoo<b><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">n).</span>&nbsp;</b></span></b>And it goes triple when there's (unlike <i><b>Drug War</b>)&nbsp;</i>one available to screen in a 35mm print, as the 4-Star is among the last Frisco Bay theatres keeping its actual film projectors running when possible. And </span><i>The Grandmaster</i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">&nbsp;is indeed screening there that way this week (as well as English-language films <b><i>The Way, Way Back</i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">&nbsp;and </span><i><a href="http://hellonfriscobay.blogspot.com/2013/07/fruitvale-station-2013.html">Fruitvale Station</a></i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">.) I don't know if the next Hong Kong production to come to the venue will be on 35mm, but I do know it's called&nbsp;</span><i>Ip Man: The Final Fight</i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;"> and it comes from two key member of the team behind another film I first saw at the 4-Star,&nbsp;</span><i>The Untold Story<span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">. <span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-style: normal;">That queasy film's co-director Herman Yau is the solo director behind this, and it reuintes him once again (they've worked together a dozen times) with that film's star Anthony Wong.</span></span></i></b></span></b><br /><br />More Chinese-language films are being brought this fall to the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.bampfa.berkeley.edu/filmseries/yangfudong">Pacific Film Archive</a>, and to the <a href="http://www.cinemasf.com/vogue/">Vogue</a>, which, thanks to the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.sffs.org/Exhibition/Fall-Season.aspx">San Francisco Film Society</a>&nbsp;will be hosting two brief mini-festivals devoted to films from Hong Kong (October 4-6) and from Taiwan (November 1-3). The line-up for the latter is as-yet unannounced, but I wonder if it's hoping too much for me to imagine it to be an opportunity to see the new <a href="http://www.fandor.com/blog/daily-gianfranco-rosis-sacro-gra-wins-the-golden-lion">Venice</a> prize-winning film from one of Taipei's best filmmakers, Tsai Ming-Liang's <b><i>Stray Dogs</i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">. Possibly, since we still haven't had a chance to see Tsai's prior feature <i><b>Face</b></i> on Frisco Bay cinema screens.</span></b><br /><b><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;"><br /></span></b><b><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">But the <a href="http://sffs.org/Exhibition/Fall-Season/Hong-Kong-Cinema">Hong Kong Cinema</a>&nbsp;series has its line-up set. Johnnie To fans won't have to wait any longer to catch up with the prolific director, as his </span><i><a href="http://www.fandor.com/blog/daily-cannes-2013-johnnie-tos-blind-detective">Blind Detective</a></i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">&nbsp;screens opening night of the festival. Another film fresh from Cannes 2013 is Flora Lau's feature debut&nbsp;</span><i><a href="http://mubi.com/notebook/posts/cannes-2013-double-bend-flora-laus-bends">Bends</a></i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">, which was shot by Wong Kar-Wai's former cinematographer Christopher Doyle, and which competed in the <i>Un Certain Regard </i>section of the French festival.&nbsp;</span></b><br /><b><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;"><br /></span></b>Johnnie To's production company Milkyway Pictures also lent support to a film made by students at the Hong Kong Academy of Performing Arts called <b><i><a href="http://sffs.org/content.aspx?catid=928,943,1640&amp;pageid=3553">A Complicated Story</a></i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">, which debuted at this year's Hong Kong International Film Festival and whose director Kiwi Chow is expected to attend his screening at the Vogue. I'm also interested in the new film from Oxide Pang called&nbsp;<a href="http://sffs.org/content.aspx?catid=928,943,1640&amp;pageid=3554"><i><b>Conspirators</b></i></a>; Pang made a splash early in his career as one half of the co-directing team behind the original </span><i>Bangkok Dangerous</i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">&nbsp;and </span><i>The Eye</i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">&nbsp;but I was less impressed with the films he made without his brother Danny Pang (and vice versa) at that time. But ten years and a pair of forgettable Hollywood films later (including the Nicholas Cage-starring remake of </span><i>Bangkok Dangerous</i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">) and it may be time to take another look at the Pang Brothers solo again.</span></b><br /><br />Finally, and perhaps most excitingly, Hong Kong Cinema will bring two of the best kung-fu movies made by the great director Lau Kar-Leung (a.k.a.&nbsp;Liu Chia-liang), who died at age 78 this past June after two decades of battling with cancer. Lau's most famous work, the action-packed but near-avant-garde in its minimalistic plot&nbsp;<b><i><a href="http://sffs.org/content.aspx?catid=928,943,1640&amp;pageid=3549">36th Chamber of Shaolin</a></i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">, will screen Saturday afternoon of the festival while </span><i><a href="http://sffs.org/content.aspx?catid=928,943,1640&amp;pageid=3552">Eight Diagram Pole Fighter</a></i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">, my own favorite martial arts movie of all time, screens Sunday. I believe these will be digital screenings, but it will be hard for me to resist attending anyway as I've never seen either film on a cinema screen with an audience. I hope the booking encourages the <a href="http://www.roxie.com/">Roxie</a> to book 35mm prints of Lau's films (of </span><i>Dirty Ho&nbsp;</i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">and <b><i>Eight Diagram Pole Figher</i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-weight: normal;">, at the very least)&nbsp;</span></b>that I hear are in the possession of&nbsp;<a href="http://dailygrindhouse.com/thewire/know-your-programmer-katie-rife-talks-to-dan-halsted-of-portlands-hollywood-theatre/">Dan Halsted</a>, who brought two kung fu double-bills to that venue last year.</span></b><br /><br />HOW: <i style="font-weight: bold;">The Grandmaster </i>screens in 35mm at the 4-Star but digitally elsewhere. It was shot mostly on film, but high-speed action shots used a digital camera.<br>2013 2013 2013 <br> <a href="http://www.matrixar.com/" title="Matrix ">المصفوفة : أجمل الخلفيات والصور</a>

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