Miyata 610, Who Loves You Baby? 2013

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Miyata 610, Who Loves You Baby? 2013

Post by Admin on Sun Sep 15, 2013 6:25 am

2013 2013 2013 <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-YEaw8ji2eTs/UhoY5plX9BI/AAAAAAAAEb4/XKnH1kbTPME/s1600/100_5280.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="256" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-YEaw8ji2eTs/UhoY5plX9BI/AAAAAAAAEb4/XKnH1kbTPME/s400/100_5280.JPG" width="400" /></a></div>As I have time, I've given my touring bike some love. It will accompany me on an adventure in September so I wanted it spiffed and in fine working order ahead of time—they'll be other last minute details to worry about.<br /><br />First up: adding two bottle cages. Since this bike hails from the 1980s when frame pumps were positioned along the seat tube, the second cage resides under the frame between front wheel and crank. It's not ideal to swap bottles while riding, but it's nonetheless much needed extra storage.<br /><br />I replaced the rear tire with Schwalbe's Marathon Tourgard. It has toothy tread with reflective sidewalls. The grooved surface should provide the traction I need on gravel rail trail.<br /><br />I have new panniers too. I wanted a lightweight set with more space than my current commuters. Even though I used them on the Provence adventure, this time we'll haul more gear in less stable weather. I know for a fact that I won't be sipping espresso and devouring baguettes purchased at campsites.<br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-IcO0YhcQVwU/UhoY5qWRBRI/AAAAAAAAEcM/5lqBkCOm4v4/s1600/100_5283.JPG" imageanchor="1"><img border="0" height="285" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-IcO0YhcQVwU/UhoY5qWRBRI/AAAAAAAAEcM/5lqBkCOm4v4/s400/100_5283.JPG" width="400" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div>Nothing updates the look of a bike like new bar tape. This go around, I wrapped cork tape, using real wine corks for bar end plugs. I'm always amazed that every time I re-wrap bars I have to do it twice. I wind the tape tight enough—that's not the problem—it's that I run out of length. Bar tape manufacturers provide bare minimum coverage. It irks me. It's funny too that once I get hang of it for one side you'd think I could wrap the other side like a pro, but no, I enfold the tape twice <i>again</i>.<br /><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-O0G4dr4G_Ko/UhoY6KCMY-I/AAAAAAAAEcY/0UvjI29j62k/s1600/100_5285.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="306" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-O0G4dr4G_Ko/UhoY6KCMY-I/AAAAAAAAEcY/0UvjI29j62k/s400/100_5285.JPG" width="400" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">A bit of garden twine completes the look. I like the looks of shellac, however<br />&nbsp;I'll pass that procedure this time. I'm happy with it's current style.<br />If you love mustache bars with shellacked cork tape, view <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/owlboogie/2938311679/in/photostream/" target="_blank">owl boogies bars</a>.<br /><br /></td></tr></tbody></table><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-hc75wS4o6YU/UhoY5iu0E4I/AAAAAAAAEb8/y7xBexx1LV4/s1600/100_5282.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="295" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-hc75wS4o6YU/UhoY5iu0E4I/AAAAAAAAEb8/y7xBexx1LV4/s400/100_5282.JPG" width="400" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-ogB-l9q9qbs/UhoY6B845EI/AAAAAAAAEcU/0zdGxnwpgqs/s1600/100_5288.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="291" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-ogB-l9q9qbs/UhoY6B845EI/AAAAAAAAEcU/0zdGxnwpgqs/s400/100_5288.JPG" width="400" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div>I attached a simple Dimensions bell that I can flick with left hand while right hand can brake, if needed. It's important that I leave ample handle bar real estate for multiple hand positions.<br /><br />Except for some minor issues to deal with, the Miyata is all set to go.<br> 2013 2013 2013 <br><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-YEaw8ji2eTs/UhoY5plX9BI/AAAAAAAAEb4/XKnH1kbTPME/s1600/100_5280.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="256" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-YEaw8ji2eTs/UhoY5plX9BI/AAAAAAAAEb4/XKnH1kbTPME/s400/100_5280.JPG" width="400" /></a></div>As I have time, I've given my touring bike some love. It will accompany me on an adventure in September so I wanted it spiffed and in fine working order ahead of time—they'll be other last minute details to worry about.<br /><br />First up: adding two bottle cages. Since this bike hails from the 1980s when frame pumps were positioned along the seat tube, the second cage resides under the frame between front wheel and crank. It's not ideal to swap bottles while riding, but it's nonetheless much needed extra storage.<br /><br />I replaced the rear tire with Schwalbe's Marathon Tourgard. It has toothy tread with reflective sidewalls. The grooved surface should provide the traction I need on gravel rail trail.<br /><br />I have new panniers too. I wanted a lightweight set with more space than my current commuters. Even though I used them on the Provence adventure, this time we'll haul more gear in less stable weather. I know for a fact that I won't be sipping espresso and devouring baguettes purchased at campsites.<br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-IcO0YhcQVwU/UhoY5qWRBRI/AAAAAAAAEcM/5lqBkCOm4v4/s1600/100_5283.JPG" imageanchor="1"><img border="0" height="285" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-IcO0YhcQVwU/UhoY5qWRBRI/AAAAAAAAEcM/5lqBkCOm4v4/s400/100_5283.JPG" width="400" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div>Nothing updates the look of a bike like new bar tape. This go around, I wrapped cork tape, using real wine corks for bar end plugs. I'm always amazed that every time I re-wrap bars I have to do it twice. I wind the tape tight enough—that's not the problem—it's that I run out of length. Bar tape manufacturers provide bare minimum coverage. It irks me. It's funny too that once I get hang of it for one side you'd think I could wrap the other side like a pro, but no, I enfold the tape twice <i>again</i>.<br /><br /><table align="center" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" class="tr-caption-container" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: center;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-O0G4dr4G_Ko/UhoY6KCMY-I/AAAAAAAAEcY/0UvjI29j62k/s1600/100_5285.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"><img border="0" height="306" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-O0G4dr4G_Ko/UhoY6KCMY-I/AAAAAAAAEcY/0UvjI29j62k/s400/100_5285.JPG" width="400" /></a></td></tr><tr><td class="tr-caption" style="text-align: center;">A bit of garden twine completes the look. I like the looks of shellac, however<br />&nbsp;I'll pass that procedure this time. I'm happy with it's current style.<br />If you love mustache bars with shellacked cork tape, view <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/owlboogie/2938311679/in/photostream/" target="_blank">owl boogies bars</a>.<br /><br /></td></tr></tbody></table><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-hc75wS4o6YU/UhoY5iu0E4I/AAAAAAAAEb8/y7xBexx1LV4/s1600/100_5282.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="295" src="http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-hc75wS4o6YU/UhoY5iu0E4I/AAAAAAAAEb8/y7xBexx1LV4/s400/100_5282.JPG" width="400" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-ogB-l9q9qbs/UhoY6B845EI/AAAAAAAAEcU/0zdGxnwpgqs/s1600/100_5288.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="margin-left: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="291" src="http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-ogB-l9q9qbs/UhoY6B845EI/AAAAAAAAEcU/0zdGxnwpgqs/s400/100_5288.JPG" width="400" /></a></div><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><br /></div>I attached a simple Dimensions bell that I can flick with left hand while right hand can brake, if needed. It's important that I leave ample handle bar real estate for multiple hand positions.<br /><br />Except for some minor issues to deal with, the Miyata is all set to go.<br>2013 2013 2013 <br> <a href="http://www.matrixar.com/" title="Matrix ">المصفوفة : أجمل الخلفيات والصور</a>

Admin
Admin

Posts : 64122
Join date : 2013-02-22

View user profile http://prowebsites1.forumaroc.net

Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum