Moths 2013

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Moths 2013

Post by Admin on Sun Sep 15, 2013 6:39 am

2013 2013 2013 <center><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-xV48vo2l24A/UeMV-Nhx1JI/AAAAAAAAF6M/vmfvel_fEdk/s1600/John+Curtis+wasps.jpg" imageanchor="1" ><img border="0" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-xV48vo2l24A/UeMV-Nhx1JI/AAAAAAAAF6M/vmfvel_fEdk/s1600/John+Curtis+wasps.jpg" /></a></center></br>Clearly the critters pictured are not moths. I couldn't bring myself to give the moths the publicity. Plus 'moths' is scary enough as a word if you’re a knitter* ... </br></br>I make no secret of the fact that I not only stash yarn but have been aiming to reach SABLE one day (that’s Stash Acquisition Beyond Life Expectancy, for the non-knitters among you). And to this end, when fitting out my new studio, I bought the overlarge <a target = "_blank" href="http://www.ikea.com/gb/en/catalog/products/70219694/">Drawers of Woolly Wonderment</a>. </br></br>But said studio’s barely big enough to swing a hamster in, and so the drawers, and thus my yarn and all the rest of my knitting paraphernalia, were dispatched to the spare bedroom. I did however reserve the best of the woolly goodness for prettifying the top shelves of the studio’s two glass-fronted bookcases, because not having at least some of my yarn where I could see it was unthinkable. And as I’m not entirely daft I packed the shelves and the drawers with an industrial quantity of lavender bags and cedar chips. </br></br>And then on Thursday I found the moth! <i>Tineola bisselliella</i>, or the common clothes moth. And worse, it was dead. Female clothes moths die after laying their eggs, usually not far from the food source they found to lay them in, and this little madam was on the shelf below the shelf with the wool. I admit I may have said a few rude words at this point. </br></br>There was nothing to do but bundle up all my lovely animal fibre yarn, seal it in Zip-loc bags, and hot foot it to a chest freezer (thanks Mum!). And wonder and worry if the freezer will be cold enough, -8°C is optimum. And fret about where else the little blighter may have visited in her travels. </br></br>I guess it’s not surprising she turned up when I’d laid on such a feast for her family. A veritable smorgasbord in fact ... wool, alpaca, even some cashmere. What mama clothes moth in the world would let mere lavender and a closed door keep her children from such delights**. Forget SABLE, I've been stocking the moth's blimmin' pantry! It's enough to make a knitter weep. In fact it's enough to make a knitter forswear buying any more yarn unless she knows exactly what she plans to knit with it and will be casting on tomorrow! </br></br>Seriously, there will be no more excessive stashing chez <b>knitsofacto</b>! And the yarn that's already here will be regularly sorted through, sealed hermetically in plastic, and popped into a freezer for a couple of weeks. Anything I'm remotely suspicious of will be given to our smallholder friends for composting. And I'll give knitting with cotton, linen and hemp a fair bit more thought than I have done previously, and ditto the dyeing of it. In fact high on this weeks to-do list is experimenting with eco friendly mordants for vegetable fibres ... buckets of soy milk here we come! I'll let you know how I get on. </br></br>Has anyone else got a moth story to share? And do please tell me what you do to protect your stash. I need all the tips I can get! </br></br>* The irony that the silks I love so much would not exist without moths is not lost on me here! </br></br>** I’m assuming here that you know it’s not the adult moth that does the damage to your woolly stuff, unlike the larvae the adults can’t eat a thing as their mouth parts are atrophied. The larvae on the other hand can both chew and digest keratin, the principal protein in animal fibre. And it’s not just the common clothes moths you need to watch for, <i>Tinea pellionella</i>, or the case-bearing clothes moth and <i>Hofmannophila pseudospretella</i>, or the brown house moth, can also pose a problem. Oh, and don't forget about carpet beetles either! </br></br>A note re. the image: 'Wasp tray, John Curtis Collection', copyright Victoria Museum. As I've mentioned before, I'm writing the biography of an obscure eighteenth century entomologist, and in the process I come across some fascinating material! </br></br><center>♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥</center></br><center>Follow the links below to subscribe to free updates via ...</br><a target="_blank" href="http://www.feedly.com/home#subscription/feed/http://feeds.feedburner.com/knitsofacto"><img src="http://i1155.photobucket.com/albums/p557/knitsofacto/29x27_zpsdcf5fdaa.png" title="Add to Feedly" /> <a target="_blank" href="http://www.feedly.com/home#subscription/feed/http://feeds.feedburner.com/knitsofacto"><span style="font-size:84%;">Feedly</span></a> </a><a target="_blank" href="http://www.bloglovin.com/en/blog/3234656"><img src="http://i1155.photobucket.com/albums/p557/knitsofacto/bloglovin25x26B_zps0de89725.png" title="Follow with Bloglovin" /></a> <a target="_blank" href="http://www.bloglovin.com/en/blog/3234656"><span style="font-size:84%;">Bloglovin</a></span> <a target="_blank" href="http://feedburner.google.com/fb/a/mailverify?uri=knitsofacto&amp;loc=en_US"><img src="http://i1155.photobucket.com/albums/p557/knitsofacto/email30x29px_zpsc2dd095d.png" title="New posts via email" /></a> <a target="_blank" href="http://feedburner.google.com/fb/a/mailverify?uri=knitsofacto&amp;loc=en_US"><span style="font-size:78%;">Email</span></a></br></br>You can also now join us on <a target = "_blank" href="http://www.ravelry.com/groups/knitsofacto">Ravelry</a>!</center><br> 2013 2013 2013 <br><center><a href="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-xV48vo2l24A/UeMV-Nhx1JI/AAAAAAAAF6M/vmfvel_fEdk/s1600/John+Curtis+wasps.jpg" imageanchor="1" ><img border="0" src="http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-xV48vo2l24A/UeMV-Nhx1JI/AAAAAAAAF6M/vmfvel_fEdk/s1600/John+Curtis+wasps.jpg" /></a></center></br>Clearly the critters pictured are not moths. I couldn't bring myself to give the moths the publicity. Plus 'moths' is scary enough as a word if you’re a knitter* ... </br></br>I make no secret of the fact that I not only stash yarn but have been aiming to reach SABLE one day (that’s Stash Acquisition Beyond Life Expectancy, for the non-knitters among you). And to this end, when fitting out my new studio, I bought the overlarge <a target = "_blank" href="http://www.ikea.com/gb/en/catalog/products/70219694/">Drawers of Woolly Wonderment</a>. </br></br>But said studio’s barely big enough to swing a hamster in, and so the drawers, and thus my yarn and all the rest of my knitting paraphernalia, were dispatched to the spare bedroom. I did however reserve the best of the woolly goodness for prettifying the top shelves of the studio’s two glass-fronted bookcases, because not having at least some of my yarn where I could see it was unthinkable. And as I’m not entirely daft I packed the shelves and the drawers with an industrial quantity of lavender bags and cedar chips. </br></br>And then on Thursday I found the moth! <i>Tineola bisselliella</i>, or the common clothes moth. And worse, it was dead. Female clothes moths die after laying their eggs, usually not far from the food source they found to lay them in, and this little madam was on the shelf below the shelf with the wool. I admit I may have said a few rude words at this point. </br></br>There was nothing to do but bundle up all my lovely animal fibre yarn, seal it in Zip-loc bags, and hot foot it to a chest freezer (thanks Mum!). And wonder and worry if the freezer will be cold enough, -8°C is optimum. And fret about where else the little blighter may have visited in her travels. </br></br>I guess it’s not surprising she turned up when I’d laid on such a feast for her family. A veritable smorgasbord in fact ... wool, alpaca, even some cashmere. What mama clothes moth in the world would let mere lavender and a closed door keep her children from such delights**. Forget SABLE, I've been stocking the moth's blimmin' pantry! It's enough to make a knitter weep. In fact it's enough to make a knitter forswear buying any more yarn unless she knows exactly what she plans to knit with it and will be casting on tomorrow! </br></br>Seriously, there will be no more excessive stashing chez <b>knitsofacto</b>! And the yarn that's already here will be regularly sorted through, sealed hermetically in plastic, and popped into a freezer for a couple of weeks. Anything I'm remotely suspicious of will be given to our smallholder friends for composting. And I'll give knitting with cotton, linen and hemp a fair bit more thought than I have done previously, and ditto the dyeing of it. In fact high on this weeks to-do list is experimenting with eco friendly mordants for vegetable fibres ... buckets of soy milk here we come! I'll let you know how I get on. </br></br>Has anyone else got a moth story to share? And do please tell me what you do to protect your stash. I need all the tips I can get! </br></br>* The irony that the silks I love so much would not exist without moths is not lost on me here! </br></br>** I’m assuming here that you know it’s not the adult moth that does the damage to your woolly stuff, unlike the larvae the adults can’t eat a thing as their mouth parts are atrophied. The larvae on the other hand can both chew and digest keratin, the principal protein in animal fibre. And it’s not just the common clothes moths you need to watch for, <i>Tinea pellionella</i>, or the case-bearing clothes moth and <i>Hofmannophila pseudospretella</i>, or the brown house moth, can also pose a problem. Oh, and don't forget about carpet beetles either! </br></br>A note re. the image: 'Wasp tray, John Curtis Collection', copyright Victoria Museum. As I've mentioned before, I'm writing the biography of an obscure eighteenth century entomologist, and in the process I come across some fascinating material! </br></br><center>♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥</center></br><center>Follow the links below to subscribe to free updates via ...</br><a target="_blank" href="http://www.feedly.com/home#subscription/feed/http://feeds.feedburner.com/knitsofacto"><img src="http://i1155.photobucket.com/albums/p557/knitsofacto/29x27_zpsdcf5fdaa.png" title="Add to Feedly" /> <a target="_blank" href="http://www.feedly.com/home#subscription/feed/http://feeds.feedburner.com/knitsofacto"><span style="font-size:84%;">Feedly</span></a> </a><a target="_blank" href="http://www.bloglovin.com/en/blog/3234656"><img src="http://i1155.photobucket.com/albums/p557/knitsofacto/bloglovin25x26B_zps0de89725.png" title="Follow with Bloglovin" /></a> <a target="_blank" href="http://www.bloglovin.com/en/blog/3234656"><span style="font-size:84%;">Bloglovin</a></span> <a target="_blank" href="http://feedburner.google.com/fb/a/mailverify?uri=knitsofacto&amp;loc=en_US"><img src="http://i1155.photobucket.com/albums/p557/knitsofacto/email30x29px_zpsc2dd095d.png" title="New posts via email" /></a> <a target="_blank" href="http://feedburner.google.com/fb/a/mailverify?uri=knitsofacto&amp;loc=en_US"><span style="font-size:78%;">Email</span></a></br></br>You can also now join us on <a target = "_blank" href="http://www.ravelry.com/groups/knitsofacto">Ravelry</a>!</center><br>2013 2013 2013 <br> <a href="http://www.matrixar.com/" title="Matrix ">المصفوفة : أجمل الخلفيات والصور</a>

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