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Post by Admin on Sun Sep 15, 2013 7:20 am

2013 2013 2013 <h4>by <a href="http://www.blogger.com/%E2%80%9Dhttps://plus.google.com/103065128923801481737?rel=author%E2%80%9D">Maria Grace</a></h4><br />In both reading and writing historical fiction, we’re on the lookout for expressions that do not fit the era. Most often the trouble is modern expressions creeping into a historical work. But here are Regency era (or older) expressions that sound far more modern than they are:<br /><br />• <b>Barbecue</b>: 1650s, "framework for grilling meat, fish, etc.," from American Spanish <i>barbacoa.</i>&nbsp;About 1730 the term was used for an outdoor feast where a whole animal was roasted and to describe the animal so roasted.<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/56/William_Hogarth_-_The_Five_Orders_of_Perriwigs.png" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;"><img border="0" height="400" src="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/56/William_Hogarth_-_The_Five_Orders_of_Perriwigs.png" width="297" /></a></div>• <b>Bigwigs</b>: As the cost of wigs increased, very large wigs (perukes) became a scheme for flaunting wealth. Bigwigs were snobs who could afford big, poufy perukes.&nbsp;<br /><br />• <b>Chock-full</b>: found about 1400; “Chock” is an alternative spelling of “choke”.<br /><br />• <b>Croak</b>: A slang verb for “to die”, from the sound of a death rattle.<br /><br />• <b>Pea-shooter</b>: 1803; quickly generalized to any ineffective weapon.<br /><br />• <b>Pronto</b>: A musical direction borrowed from Italian in 1744, meaning “quickly”<br />.<br />• <b>Real thing</b>: meaning genuine, was first used in 1818.<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: large;"><a href="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e9/Redtape1.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="239" src="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e9/Redtape1.JPG" width="320" /></a></span></div>&nbsp;• <b>Red Tape</b>: excessive bureaucratic nonsense, from the red tape used to bind up legal and other official documents.<br /><br />• <b>Sell out</b>: An officer who has sold his commission back to the army; the way an officer would retire from an army career.<br /><br />• <b>Snug as a bug in a rug</b>: A rug was a particularly heavy blanket for sleeping and “bug” refers to a bedbug.<br /><br />&nbsp;• <b>So-so</b>: mediocre; first recorded use as an adverb was in 1530 and as an adjective (so-so wine) in 1542.<br /><span style="font-size: large;"><br /></span> <a href="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e5/Colonel_George_K._H._Coussmaker,_Grenadier_Guards_by_Joshua_Reynolds_1782.jpeg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; float: right; font-size: x-large; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e5/Colonel_George_K._H._Coussmaker,_Grenadier_Guards_by_Joshua_Reynolds_1782.jpeg" width="193" /></a>• <b>Son of a gun</b>: the illegitimate son of a militia officer.<br /><br />• <b>Swagger</b>. To bully, brag, or boast, also to strut.<br /><br />• <b>Sweet heart</b>: a girl's lover, or a man's mistress; from a sweet cake in the shape of a heart.<br /><br />• <b>To wet one's whistle</b>: to drink.<br /><br />• <b>Turned off</b>: a convict would climb a ladder to the gallows. The prisoner would be ‘turned off’ the ladder to be hanged.<br /><br />• <b>White lie</b>: A harmless lie, one not told with a malicious intent, a lie told to reconcile people at odds with one another.<br /><br />• <b>Whitewashed</b>: One who has taken the benefit of an act of insolvency, to defraud his creditors, has been whitewashed.<br /><br />• <b>Wild-goose chase</b>: A tedious uncertain pursuit, like the following a flock of shy, wild geese.<br /><br />• <b>Word of Mouth</b>: To drink by word of mouth, i.e. out of the bowl or bottle instead, of a glass.<br /><br />And my personal favorite:<br /><br />• <b>Kerfuffle</b>: an agitated disturbance; goes back to 1583.<br /><br /><b><u>References</u>&nbsp;</b><br /><br />Grose, Captain (Francis). (2004) <b>Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue</b>, 1811 ed. Ikon Classics<br /><a href="http://www.etymonline.com/" target="_blank"><b>Online Etymology Dictionary</b>&nbsp; </a><br /><a href="http://mentalfloss.com/article/31056/why-did-people-wear-powdered-wigs#ixzz2XpY26guw" target="_blank"><b>Why Did People Wear Powdered Wigs?</b></a> <br /><br />~~~~~~~~~~~~<br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://illiweb.com/fa/pbucket.gif" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" src="http://illiweb.com/fa/pbucket.gif" /></a></div>&nbsp;Maria Grace is the author of <i><a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/B006VZOSCO" target="_blank">Darcy's Decision,&nbsp;</a> </i> <i><a href="http://www.amazon.com/Future-Darcy-Given-Principles-ebook/dp/B008H5UBEU" target="_blank">The Future Mrs. Darcy</a> </i>and<i></i> <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Appearance-Goodness-Given-Principles-ebook/dp/B00BWAJ0TE" target="_blank"><i>All the Appearance of Goodness</i></a>.&nbsp; <a href="http://amazon.com/author/mariagrace">Click here</a> to find her books on Amazon. For more on her writing and other <i>Random Bits of Fascination</i>, visit her <a href="http://authormariagrace.com/">website</a>. You can also like her on <a href="http://facebook.com/AuthorMariaGrace">Facebook, </a> <a href="https://twitter.com/WriteMariaGrace" target="_blank">follow on Twitter</a> or <a href="mailto:author.mariagrace@gmail.com" target="_blank">email</a><a href="mailto:author.mariagrace@gmail.com" target="_blank"> her.</a> <br> 2013 2013 2013 <br><h4>by <a href="http://www.blogger.com/%E2%80%9Dhttps://plus.google.com/103065128923801481737?rel=author%E2%80%9D">Maria Grace</a></h4><br />In both reading and writing historical fiction, we’re on the lookout for expressions that do not fit the era. Most often the trouble is modern expressions creeping into a historical work. But here are Regency era (or older) expressions that sound far more modern than they are:<br /><br />• <b>Barbecue</b>: 1650s, "framework for grilling meat, fish, etc.," from American Spanish <i>barbacoa.</i>&nbsp;About 1730 the term was used for an outdoor feast where a whole animal was roasted and to describe the animal so roasted.<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/56/William_Hogarth_-_The_Five_Orders_of_Perriwigs.png" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;"><img border="0" height="400" src="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/56/William_Hogarth_-_The_Five_Orders_of_Perriwigs.png" width="297" /></a></div>• <b>Bigwigs</b>: As the cost of wigs increased, very large wigs (perukes) became a scheme for flaunting wealth. Bigwigs were snobs who could afford big, poufy perukes.&nbsp;<br /><br />• <b>Chock-full</b>: found about 1400; “Chock” is an alternative spelling of “choke”.<br /><br />• <b>Croak</b>: A slang verb for “to die”, from the sound of a death rattle.<br /><br />• <b>Pea-shooter</b>: 1803; quickly generalized to any ineffective weapon.<br /><br />• <b>Pronto</b>: A musical direction borrowed from Italian in 1744, meaning “quickly”<br />.<br />• <b>Real thing</b>: meaning genuine, was first used in 1818.<br /><br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: large;"><a href="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e9/Redtape1.JPG" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" height="239" src="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e9/Redtape1.JPG" width="320" /></a></span></div>&nbsp;• <b>Red Tape</b>: excessive bureaucratic nonsense, from the red tape used to bind up legal and other official documents.<br /><br />• <b>Sell out</b>: An officer who has sold his commission back to the army; the way an officer would retire from an army career.<br /><br />• <b>Snug as a bug in a rug</b>: A rug was a particularly heavy blanket for sleeping and “bug” refers to a bedbug.<br /><br />&nbsp;• <b>So-so</b>: mediocre; first recorded use as an adverb was in 1530 and as an adjective (so-so wine) in 1542.<br /><span style="font-size: large;"><br /></span> <a href="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e5/Colonel_George_K._H._Coussmaker,_Grenadier_Guards_by_Joshua_Reynolds_1782.jpeg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; float: right; font-size: x-large; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;"><img border="0" height="320" src="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e5/Colonel_George_K._H._Coussmaker,_Grenadier_Guards_by_Joshua_Reynolds_1782.jpeg" width="193" /></a>• <b>Son of a gun</b>: the illegitimate son of a militia officer.<br /><br />• <b>Swagger</b>. To bully, brag, or boast, also to strut.<br /><br />• <b>Sweet heart</b>: a girl's lover, or a man's mistress; from a sweet cake in the shape of a heart.<br /><br />• <b>To wet one's whistle</b>: to drink.<br /><br />• <b>Turned off</b>: a convict would climb a ladder to the gallows. The prisoner would be ‘turned off’ the ladder to be hanged.<br /><br />• <b>White lie</b>: A harmless lie, one not told with a malicious intent, a lie told to reconcile people at odds with one another.<br /><br />• <b>Whitewashed</b>: One who has taken the benefit of an act of insolvency, to defraud his creditors, has been whitewashed.<br /><br />• <b>Wild-goose chase</b>: A tedious uncertain pursuit, like the following a flock of shy, wild geese.<br /><br />• <b>Word of Mouth</b>: To drink by word of mouth, i.e. out of the bowl or bottle instead, of a glass.<br /><br />And my personal favorite:<br /><br />• <b>Kerfuffle</b>: an agitated disturbance; goes back to 1583.<br /><br /><b><u>References</u>&nbsp;</b><br /><br />Grose, Captain (Francis). (2004) <b>Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue</b>, 1811 ed. Ikon Classics<br /><a href="http://www.etymonline.com/" target="_blank"><b>Online Etymology Dictionary</b>&nbsp; </a><br /><a href="http://mentalfloss.com/article/31056/why-did-people-wear-powdered-wigs#ixzz2XpY26guw" target="_blank"><b>Why Did People Wear Powdered Wigs?</b></a> <br /><br />~~~~~~~~~~~~<br /><div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="http://illiweb.com/fa/pbucket.gif" imageanchor="1" style="clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;"><img border="0" src="http://illiweb.com/fa/pbucket.gif" /></a></div>&nbsp;Maria Grace is the author of <i><a href="http://www.amazon.com/dp/B006VZOSCO" target="_blank">Darcy's Decision,&nbsp;</a> </i> <i><a href="http://www.amazon.com/Future-Darcy-Given-Principles-ebook/dp/B008H5UBEU" target="_blank">The Future Mrs. Darcy</a> </i>and<i></i> <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Appearance-Goodness-Given-Principles-ebook/dp/B00BWAJ0TE" target="_blank"><i>All the Appearance of Goodness</i></a>.&nbsp; <a href="http://amazon.com/author/mariagrace">Click here</a> to find her books on Amazon. For more on her writing and other <i>Random Bits of Fascination</i>, visit her <a href="http://authormariagrace.com/">website</a>. You can also like her on <a href="http://facebook.com/AuthorMariaGrace">Facebook, </a> <a href="https://twitter.com/WriteMariaGrace" target="_blank">follow on Twitter</a> or <a href="mailto:author.mariagrace@gmail.com" target="_blank">email</a><a href="mailto:author.mariagrace@gmail.com" target="_blank"> her.</a> <br>2013 2013 2013 <br> <a href="http://www.matrixar.com/" title="Matrix ">المصفوفة : أجمل الخلفيات والصور</a>

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